Just after some of your thoughts and wisdom, so don’t just read – leave a comment too!!

Thinking about how people interact with each other, particularly at work. Don’t know about you but I can remember some managers who you would not want to approach for advice on a problem you were trying to solve.

How does your manager help you or otherwise when you are seeking advice because you have failed to find the solution to a problem? Which side of the fence do they fall on: command or coach?

Don’t be afraid: share your experiences. Thanks

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2 thoughts on “Seeking Advice

  1. Over the years I’ve worked for both types of managers that you mention. I would definitely say that the manager who is a coach is my preference.

    My current manager falls on this side of the fence & has created an environment where team members aren’t afraid to seek their or other team members advice, in fact they encourage us to discuss our work.

    Asking for help isn’t about looking stupid because you don’t know how to tackle something but about accepting that other people may have more experience of how to deal with an issue than you or can look at it in another way.

    I think that one of the ways you can tell what type of manager a person might be is by the way that they deal with employees mistakes. My manager doesn’t view them as disasters & start ranting (as I have experienced in the past) but looks at them as opportunities to learn. She looks at what procedures the company can put in place &/or what training they might need to give the staff member so it doesn’t happen again. Obviously she isn’t too happy if you keeping making the same mistakes!

    I remember in one company where I worked the staff complained about the blame culture that had generated in the office. Our Operations Manager didn’t agree with this but our point was proven correct when one of the other managers came into the room & was annoyed about something someone had done & said ‘Who is to blame for this?’
    This person spent more time looking at the problems than at the solutions.

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